The Road Map Project ELL Work Group

The Road Map English Language Learner (ELL) Work Group, staffed and led by OneAmerica, brings together representatives and leaders from school districts, research partners, higher education and early learning constituents, community based organizations, school boards, and state education departments from across South King County to drastically improve the education outcome for English Language Learner students in the region.

The ELL Work Group is part of a broader initiative called the Road Map Project, a region-wide collective impact initiative with the goal of doubling the number of students in South King County who are on track to graduate college or earn a career credential by 2020. Collective impact is a powerful strategy of social change, in which all participants share a common goal and align their work through a common agenda.

The ELL Work Group brings together key partners in the Road Map Region of South Seattle and South King County to ensure our work is aligned with cradle to career goals region-wide and ELLs are fully integrated and prioritized within the system.

OUR WORK

In 2013, the ELL Work Group incubated and built-out several regional programs that have resulted in several victories as a result of the collective strategy. Map

In December 2013, the ELL Work Group finalized their action plan, a comprehensive framework and toolkit for improving education for ELLs. At the start of January 2014, the group launched the implementation phase of the action plan, using the implementation toolkit as a guide and resource. 

The World Language Credit Program: Implementing policies and practices in all seven Road Map Project school districts to allow students to earn competency-based credit for knowledge of their home language.  This program was one of two award winners out of 62 nominations for the Road Map Project Collective Impact Awards Program.

In October 2014, Education Northwest conducted a study of the Road Map's World Language Credit Program, and found that he program created a positive recognition of the value of bilingualism, which increased students’ pride and their appreciation of their own strengths.

More Funding for ELLs: $18.8 million in the 2013 legislative session was allocated for extra support to ELL students who are in transition (level 4s) to help students who are English proficient reach academic proficiency. This funding resulted from the ELL work group advocating for these additional resources and is being used to support afterschool supports, classroom aids to promote individualized instruction, and other innovative projects to close the opportunity gap for ELLs

ELL Endorsements: 80 ELL endorsements for teachers and principals in the Road Map Project region.  
2014 projects currently underway include: Building a stronger para educator-to-teacher pipeline, providing stronger support around ELL instructional practice to align with common core standards, and exploring alternative models of educational support for high school ELL students.

2014 projects currently underway Pie Graphinclude: Building a stronger para educator-to-teacher pipeline, providing stronger support around ELL instructional practice to align with common core standards, and exploring alternative models of educational support for high school ELL students.

HOW TO READ THE ACTION PLAN: The action plan uses a framework developed by the ELL Work Group that targets five critical focus areas, which must all be addressed in order to fully support the student: positive identity and primary language development, parent engagement, data collection, instructional practice, and post-secondary success. Each focus area has two goals and several strategies for how to achieve each goal.  The toolkit contains detailed action steps meant to serve as a guide for implementing each strategy.

 

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